Tileable Textures

When you need to cover huge surfaces with a texture, instead of using a really big and heavy texture, we'll use a small tileable texture, being able to repeat it over and over again across the surface, giving the impression of a big and high resolution texture. In this tutorial, we'll see some different ways of using tileable textures in Blender.

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Normal Maps Baking

Normal Maps store information about light direction, allowing our simple model to look as detailed as if it had millions of polygons. In this tutorial we'll explain how this maps work, how they are projected, and how to bake them and see them on the 3DView. Then we'll take a look at how we can bake more types of textures, as an example we'll bake the Ambient Oclussion from a high resolution mesh. This technique is very useful for videogames, in which our polycounts are limited, and this way we can display much more detail than real polygons!

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How to use Quick Projection

Sometimes is difficult to paint textures in blender, as well as in photoshop/gimp, without a 3d reference. This times are when this tool comes very handy! Quick Projection allows you take a screenshot, open it in you image editor software, paint over it, and project it back into blender! This feature makes the process easier and it's pretty automated (that's why it's called quick hehe). 

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Texture Painting in Blender

Everyone knows that Blender can be used for modeling and animating in 3D. But it can actually do much more things. One of them is painting textures right over your 3D models, and you'll learn how to do it in this tutorial. Of course you can paint textures into Blender, but even if you prefer to do it using 2D painting softwares, this feature can be an invaluable help. You can place details on your 3d model, and use that painting as a reference... or even for correcting seams on your final textures. What you use it for is up to you! :D

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